Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for ankle osteoarthritis and avascular necrosis of the talus

People usually contact our office to discuss their ankle problems after they have had a long medical history of treatments following an acute ankle injury that turned into a chronic problem. Over the years they have had splints, tapes, and anti-inflammatory medications, some have had physical therapy and some have had cortisone injections. After all these treatments, they are still looking for answers. One answer they are seeking is Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy or PRP therapy.

PRP treatments are injection treatments. The treatments are derived from your own healing and growth factors found in your blood. The treatment involves collecting a small amount of your blood and concentrating it in a centrifuge to separate the blood platelets from the red blood cells. The collected platelets are then injected into areas in and around the ankle to stimulate healing and regeneration to the soft tissue structures that stabilize the ankle.

An August 2021 paper in The Journal of foot and ankle surgery (1) summarizes the treatments application and effectiveness in patients with ankle osteoarthritis.

“Ankle osteoarthritis can cause disabling symptoms, and some patients prefer to be treated with minimally invasive procedures. The aim (of this study) was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single intraarticular injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for patients with ankle osteoarthritis.”

In this paper, the research team recruited patients who suffered with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis for at least 6 months. These patients received a single injection of PRP into the painful  ankles.

What were the researchers looking for? In the 39 patients who completed the study, outcomes were:

  • The primary outcome was a decrease in pain.
  • Secondary outcomes were increased function, less disability, less medication usage, and the patient’s overall satisfaction with the treatment.

Study findings:

  • Significantly improvement was seen in pain scores at one, three, and six-month follow-ups.
  • Function improved, less disability was felt, medication usage dropped significantly.

The study conclusion: “(This) study showed promise for a single intraarticular injection of PRP in the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis.

Dr. Darrow treats the ankle

 

Platelet rich plasma for treatment of osteochondral lesions and cartilage repair of the talus

Many people of the patients we see, as mentioned above, initially contacted me to ask about the ankle pain they suffer from. Many will describe a terrible accident or injury that they had in the past. Their ankle was very damaged and for them, surgery or long bouts of casting and immobilization were able to put their ankle back together as best as possible. Over the years these people managed along managing various bouts of pain and stiffness. At some point osteoarthritis developed in the ankle and their surgeon recommended an ankle replacement or an ankle fusion. Many declined these surgeries as they saw the surgery as the end of their activities and the welcoming point of a sedentary lifestyle. Once having declined the surgery, these people now resorted to ankle braces, cortisone and hyaluronic acid injections. Treatments and remedies that had now become ineffective for them.

For many people, PRP treatments can help. This was suggested in a 2020 study in the Journal of orthopaedics.(2) Here are the research notes of this study:

“Osteochondral lesion of the talus is common among athletes and is a result of talar cartilage detachment with or without subchondral bone fragmentation after a traumatic event. Treatment strategies for Osteochondral lesion of the talus can be classified as reparative or replacement interventions, with (replacement) taking precedence. Recent studies show that the growth factors and bioactive components in platelet rich plasma (PRP) could improve cartilage regeneration. The prospect of using autologous blood to obtain a product that could enhance regeneration in damaged cartilage has been regarded as innovative, as it could circumvent the need for a replacement, and potentially join the ranks of first line reparative interventions against cartilage diseases. . .

 PRP improves joint function, and reduces pain in patients with Osteochondral lesion of the talus regardless of the method of implementation. In addition, inter-study comparison demonstrated that patients that received surgery along with PRP injections improved more than those that received PRP only. The studies that corroborate this conclusion have high levels of evidence with satisfactory methodological quality.”

Typically we try to repair the ankle without the surgery recommendation as surgery of course comes with its own challenges. Further many people that we see have already had surgery that did not produce the hoped for results.

Dr. Darrow treats the ankle

PRP’s physiological effects include:

  • Increasing tissue regeneration (tendon, ligament, soft tissue).
  • Decreasing inflammation.
  • Decreasing pain.
  • Increasing collagen (base component of connective tissue and cartilage).

Can PRP help you avoid surgery?

This is a question that is obviously often asked as many patients who visit us have a surgical recommendation.

A study in The Journal of foot and ankle surgery (3) sought to answer this question:

“Currently, the conservative treatment of osteoarthritis is limited to symptomatic treatment, whose goal is to improve function and pain control. Ankle osteoarthritis is relatively uncommon, in contrast to osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, and the therapeutic options (both pharmacologic and surgical) are limited, with surgery providing poorer and less predictable results. The effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma injections for osteoarthritis is still controversial, especially so for ankle arthritis, owing to the lack of evidence in the present data.”

What the researchers set up was a study to evaluate the mid- to long-term clinical results (avergae follow-up of 17.7 months) for platelet-rich plasma injections in 20 patients (20 ankles) with ankle osteoarthritis. What they found was: “a strong positive effect for 4 platelet-rich plasma injections (injected once a week) on pain and function, with 80% of patients very satisfied and satisfied, and only 2 patients (10%) required surgery because of early treatment failure. These results suggest that the use of platelet-rich plasma injection is a valid and safe alternative to postpone the need for surgery.”

Can we help with your ankle pain?

Generally speaking, if your ankle is not frozen or locked up with bone spurs and can rotate, even through the pain, then we can have a realistic expectation that we can provide some help. How much help? We can’t be sure until we do the examination. Please us the form to email me about your ankle pain.

References for this article

1 Sun SF, Hsu CW, Lin GC, Lin HS, Chou YJ, Wu SY, Huang HY. Efficacy and Safety of a Single Intra-articular Injection of Platelet-rich Plasma on Pain and Physical Function in Patients With Ankle Osteoarthritis—A Prospective Study. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery. 2021 Feb 3.
2 Yausep OE, Madhi I, Trigkilidas D. Platelet rich plasma for treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus: a systematic review of clinical trials. Journal of orthopaedics. 2020 Mar 1;18:218-25.
3 Paget LD, Reurink G, de Vos RJ, Weir A, Moen MH, Bierma-Zeinstra SM, Stufkens SA, Kerkhoffs GM, Tol JL, Goedegebuure S, Krips R. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections vs Placebo on Ankle Symptoms and Function in Patients With Ankle Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2021 Oct 26;326(16):1595-605.

 

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